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Dying In Peace to Die At Peace: New Terms of Engagement

If you've got a loved one that will die in the 21st century, listen up: everyone wants to die in peace; very few of us do (too many impediments). What don't we know that would position us on a glidepath to increase our likelihood of dying in peace? Could there be more than one non-euphemistic word for dying that would better inform our sense of choice and perhaps our purpose? Get a jumpstart on this vital topic so that neither you nor your patient-family have to go bonkers when you want to go in peace. The essential dying conversation starts here with an Ignite introduction—and it's a deeper, broader, more explanatory conversation than is nascent in our country at the moment.
(updated 10/4/2012 13:51)

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    Bart WindrumBart Windrum shared this idea  ·   ·  Admin →

    14 comments

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      • Ronn HuffRonn Huff commented  · 

        Bart has significantly advanced the public conversation on how to improve the dying experience through constructive family-caregiver collaboration. His book is a must-read for hospital clinicians.

      • Casey QuinlanCasey Quinlan commented  · 

        Everyone has a unique life experience. Everyone, at the end of that unique life experience, has the same common experience: dying. Humans have feared conversations about death and dying for millennia - it's past time to start having those essential discussions. Bart Windrum is the best spark plug I know of to fire up that engine.

      • Anonymous commented  · 

        There are few topics that apply to nearly everyone. Bart brings to us a topic that concerns us all, though many would like to believe that may not be true. It is only when we take time to consider the issues Bart helps us face, that we discover that facts and strategies can help us address fearful possibilities. The worst possible time to start thinking about this topic is when it is forced upon us by a death event. That's what makes Bart's message so important.

      • Terry KoriTerry Kori commented  · 

        Bart's efforts to bring dying into the conversation of life are both viable and valuable. It's the thing we don't allow ourselves to think about until we are hit with it head on. A loved one can all-too-quickly become compromised by the inordinate complications of hospitalization; in the ensuing maelstrom the family's ability to comprehend and function is diminished, not enhanced. To "die at peace" requires foresight and preparation, which cannot happen without conversation. Let the talking begin...

      • BonnieBonnie commented  · 

        Windrum's death-and-dying experiences with family members have earned him the right to be heard on this topic. He's a "must-hear"!

      • Bill ColemanBill Coleman commented  · 

        This is a must see and hear presentation. This guy really know what he's talking about. A chance to gain insight into the world of doctors, hospitals and the last days of a loved ones life. Don't miss it!

      • Bart WindrumBart Windrum commented  · 

        I need to add, for Ignite Denver organizers, that some commenters' kind references to my book here are unsolicited, and that in my proposed presentation neither I nor the deck make any reference to the book or my authorship.

      • Anne FeistAnne Feist commented  · 

        After reading Notes from the Waiting Room, I know what questions to ask, what to expect and what choices I have if/when a loved one is facing a hospitalization. It made me confront many necessary issues that were uncomfortable but needed to be addressed.

      • Anonymous commented  · 

        An essential topic at the rioght monment.

      • Bart WindrumBart Windrum commented  · 

        1. For completeness, the book Alex refers to is Notes from the Waiting Room: Managing a Loved One's (End of Life) Hospitalization. This Spark starts and ends at points beyond what I wrote in Notes during 2005-08.

        2. And the deck shown at Partnership With Patients is now completely superseded, with content filled in and a complete visual overhaul :).

      • Anonymous commented  · 

        Few die well. Families compound the process. When will we get it right. Important topic. Include it.

      • Alexandra WhitneyAlexandra Whitney commented  · 

        This is an extremely important book for everyone to read!!!

      • Anonymous commented  · 

        Bart Windrum's presentation at Partnership With Patients was transformative! He speaks with personal conviction and a careful logical progression of thought. His beautiful slides heighten the understanding of his words.

      • Anonymous commented  · 

        Among the most important topics of our day. We must understand dying, we must accept death. We must ALL engage in this conversation.

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